Is Premature Ejaculation Curable?

by | May 3, 2022 | SEX

A male sexual dysfunction characterised by a difficulty controlling orgasm to the point where ejaculation occurs too quickly, premature ejaculation is one of the most common sexual problems affecting men worldwide.

When premature ejaculation constantly interferes with sexual performance, health impacts can snowball beyond relationship problems in the bedroom to play a role in decreased libido, and the manifestation of mental and physical problems.

If your sex life features constant bouts of premature ejaculation, it may seem like the only thoughts consuming your mind are those relating to whether there’s a way to regain control and delay ejaculation for longer-lasting sex. So, let’s find out, can premature ejaculation be cured?

But first, what is premature ejaculation?

Premature ejaculation is a sexual dysfunction characterised by an uncontrollable act of “coming too soon” during sexual intercourse. It can occur when a partner stimulates the penis during penetrative sex or oral sex, or alone during masturbation.

There are two classifications: acquired premature ejaculation and lifelong premature ejaculation.

Acquired premature ejaculation refers to a sudden development of premature ejaculation after a period of time where no ejaculation problems have occurred.

Lifelong premature ejaculation refers to premature ejaculation that has occurred for most, if not all, sexual situations from the very first experience of the penis being sexually stimulated.

How common is premature ejaculation?

According to this 2015 systematic review, premature ejaculation is a common problem affecting 20-30% of men during their lifetime. In comparison to the risk of erectile dysfunction that increases with age, rates of premature ejaculation remain constant across an entire adult life span. Most men will experience premature ejaculation at least once; unfortunately it seems to be an unwritten law of manhood.

What is the average time of ejaculation?

When it comes to the ideal time of ejaculation, what’s the duration benchmark you should aim for? Is it three minutes? Five minutes? Half an hour? An hour?

Enjoy a sigh of relief, because there is no specific timing guideline on when ejaculation occurs. There are many variables involved in how and when one climaxes, and every person is different. Whether you’re playing solo, in a long term relationship, or with a new sexual partner, ejaculating is totally dependent on your unique experience at any given moment. And every time is different.

What causes premature ejaculation?

Experts once conceived the cause of premature ejaculation to be based purely on psychological factors. It’s now thought that the exact cause involves a chemical imbalance in the section of the brain that controls penile function. Ironically, this chemical imbalance can lead to psychological issues and performance anxiety, rather than the other way around.

Other factors that can contribute to the onset of premature ejaculation include:

  • Experiences of sexual abuse and trauma
  • Early sexual experiences

  • Depression

  • Anxiety

  • Poor body image

  • Religious beliefs

  • Persistent worry regarding coming too early

  • Feelings of guilt that force you to rush through sex

  • Relationship problems

  • Erectile dysfunction

What are the symptoms of premature ejaculation?

Men living with premature ejaculation may experience:

  • Trouble controlling when they ejaculate

  • Quick ejaculation within a minute of sexual penetration

  • Performance anxiety that affects normal ejaculation

If you’re nodding your head in approval of any or all of these symptoms, it may be time to see your doctor for a formal diagnosis.

How is premature ejaculation diagnosed?

If blowing your load too early is causing distress in your sexual relationships, the first step is to seek medical help via your trusted healthcare providers (e.g. doctor, urologist or sex therapist).

There is no test to diagnose premature ejaculation, so your healthcare provider will start by asking a series of questions relating to your sexual history, sexual health, and general health. Based on the information you provide, your chosen healthcare provider will be in a position to assess, identify, and form a treatment plan to slow ejaculation and treat erectile dysfunction.

How is premature ejaculation treated?

Treatment options for premature ejaculation vary depending on the cause and whether the condition is acquired or lifelong. Treating premature ejaculation may involve:

Counselling

When premature ejaculation is caused by underlying anxieties or psychological factors, engaging in psychological therapy or speaking with a sex therapist can help. Alternatively, couples therapy can assist in easing performance anxiety caused by relationship issues or low sex drive.

Behavioural techniques

Treatment for premature ejaculation can involve simple behavioural techniques, like the “stop-start” or “squeeze” methods.

The “stop start” technique develops greater penile control by bringing yourself to the verge of orgasm before stopping and resting. Then repeating until you recognise your ‘point of no return’, ultimately achieving delayed ejaculation.

The “squeeze” technique involves squeezing the head of your penis pre-ejaculation to minimise the urge to orgasm.

Kegel exercises

Kegel exercises are internal contraction exercises to prevent premature ejaculation. They work by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles.

General practice when it comes to Kegels, is to first identify the muscles of your pelvic floor. You can find your pelvic floor muscles by stopping your flow mid-stream when urinating. The muscles that contract when you stop your flow are your pelvic floor muscles.

To practice Kegels, perform this same contracting movement with an empty bladder. Hold for 10 second and repeat 10 times, three times per day.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants

Another way to treat premature ejaculation is with medications that delay ejaculation, however SSRIs can include side effects. Always consult with your doctor before taking medication for premature ejaculation and report any side effects as soon as they arise.

Anaesthetic sprays and creams

Want to reach orgasm later rather than sooner? Local anaesthetic sprays and creams that reduce penile sensation when applied to the penis may be the answer. Just remember to wear a condom to prevent partner absorption if sprays or creams are your sexual medicine of choice.

Erectile dysfunction treatments

In cases of rapid ejaculation occurring alongside other symptoms of erectile dysfunction, some men can decrease sensation by taking treatments, like PDE5 inhibitors, to improve normal penile function.

Can premature ejaculation be cured on its own?

Premature ejaculation is a medical problem with potential to go away on its own, however non-treatment doesn’t guarantee results.

If you’re wondering how to last longer in bed without medical treatment, there are many self-help techniques to try, including:

  • Masturbating a few hours before sex to decrease sensation

  • Wearing a thick condom to desensitise the penis (timely reminder to brush up on everything you need to know about the male condom)

  • Taking a deep breath or two during sex to delay the ejaculatory reflex

  • Taking breaks during sexual intercourse

  • Engaging in foreplay to increase your sexual tolerance

  • Mentally distracting yourself during intercourse can shift focus (and the pressure to perform) to something completely different, although some men say alternate thoughts can shut down libido altogether

We’re here to help!

Through our online portal you can have proven PE treatments delivered to your door. Organise your PE consult with one of our Aussie doctors today.

 

Stagger

Here at Stagger we are committed to men getting the best out of every moment. Love yourself!

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